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Egyptian Bat

Price
£3,000
Photography medium: C-type photography

Unframed

Edition of 20 (0 available)

Gallery: Crane Kalman Brighton

Ships from: United Kingdom

Note: Shipping cost are calculated at checkout

Description

About the artwork
Egyptian Bat is a stunning C-Type print by contemporary British photographer Tim Flach in an Edition of 20. All prints are produced to order. Lead times between 5-10 days.Flach has mainly become renown for his highly stylized animal portraits, which are far removed from traditional wildlife photography’s images of animals observed in their natural habitat.In More Than Human, Flach explores the animal world through its well-known and lesser-known species. From mammals to marine animals, Flach depicts these incredible animals in a portrait-like setting so his sitters take on an anthropomorphised character.

Specification

Medium C-type photography
Support Paper
Framed? No
Subjects Abstract,
Style Contemporary
Original or Edition? Edition of 20
Certificate of Authenticity Yes
Year created 2015
Artwork Dimensions: 61 X 53 X 0.1 X cm

About Tim Flach

Tim Flach is an animal photographer with an interest in the way humans shape animals and shape their meaning while exploring the role of imagery in fostering an emotional connection. Bringing to life the complexity of the animal kingdom, his work ranges widely across species, united by a distinctive stylisation reflecting an interest in how we better connect people to the natural world. 

He has four major bodies of work concerning different subjects: Equus (2008) focusing on the horse, Dogs Gods (2010) on canines, More Than Human (2012) a broad exploration of the world’s species, and Endangered (2017) a powerful document of species on the edge of extinction. He has published five books; Endangered (2017), Evolution (2013), More than Human, (2012), Dogs Gods (2010) and Equus (2008).  Flach is an Honorary Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society and was awarded an Honorary Doctorate from the University of the Arts London in 2013, in recognition of his contribution to photography. He lives and works in London with his wife and son.